Cancer Control Activities in Australian Public Hospitals

Date: 
1994-01-01
Description: 
Cancer is a major cause of death in Australia and there is considerable interest in the role health education in hospital settings has in reducing this burden. Based on a survey of medical superintendents and other hospital staff, this article describes the cancer control activities routinely conducted in Australian public hospitals. The survey considered cigarette smoking, alcohol, diet and nutrition, exercise, and the early detection of skin cancer, cervical cancer, and breast cancer. Overall 112 medical superintendents (93%) participated and a further 163 hospital staff members provided additional details. Not unexpectedly, the survey confirmed the very low level of activity and identified a number of specific issues that need to be addressed in order to enhance cancer control activities in public hospitals. Given the relatively higher level of activity, and the prominence of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption as health issues, one approach might be to initially concentrate on these areas when they are related to the patient's condition. Article in International Quarterly of Community Health Education 15(3):229-40 · January 1994
Resource type: 
Identifier: 
10.14655/11971-1036572
Type: 
text
Rights: 
The authors
Language: 
Language=en